Virtual Reality is exciting. It gets a “wow” response every time; it sparks conversation; the goggles draw a crowd. But those who use the technology on a daily basis know that VR has much more to offer than simply novelty.

What makes VR the powerful communication and sales tool that it’s being used for today is the emotional impact it creates in the viewing experience. Yulio’s VR technology is currently powering the Information Centre for Dream’s new Saskatoon community development, offering community members and potential homebuyers the opportunity to experience the unbuilt development in Virtual Reality.

It’s here that Virtual Reality becomes more than a tool for visualization: it’s a vehicle for emotions. “They wanted people to feel like they were already living there,” says Christophe Chevallier, Art Director of Toronto architectural visualization studio Norm Li, the designers behind Brighton’s virtual worlds.

VR technology offers an opportunity for deeply personal experience: homebuyers can envision themselves in their future community, relaxing in the park with family, jogging through nature trails and frequenting local shopping outlets.

And, as any sophisticated business knows, emotion is the most effective and persuasive sales tool. VR’s ability to create an emotional experience comes from its inherently immersive nature, which puts a viewer inside a space, transforming ordinary vision to extraordinary emotional immersion.

The concept of emotional selling is not new. Peter Gruber explains the phenomenon as being in the “emotional transportation business:” business is most effective not when it presents all the relevant information, but when your customers experience the value of what you’re selling emotionally.

If the power of Virtual Reality comes down to any one particular thing, it’s exactly this: emotional transportation. If you’re looking to engage your clients on a deeper level and better present your value, head to www.yulio.com to find out more about using Virtual Reality in your business.